Los Angeles Employment And Labor Newsletters

Employment Lawyers Honor Firefighter Who Fought Against Discrimination

Arnett Hartsfield Jr. Leaves a Legacy of Equality in Los Angeles A Los Angeles legend, Arnett Hartsfield Jr., has died. He was a leading figure in combatting racial discrimination for African-Americans in the LA fire department. From 1940 to 1961, he served in the fire department while earning a law degree. His years of service coincided with a huge transition in American fire departments. For instance, the fire department was not integrated until 1955, and when African-American firefighters were transferred to new departments, they were met with open hostility. Yet, they were still isolated after integration, as they were not allowed to sit with or eat with white firefighters, drink the station coffee, read the station newspaper or use the station pay phone for personal calls. When he left the department, he went to court and passionately argued against inequality in promotions and the ongoing racial harassment at the station….
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Are Corporations or Franchises Responsible for Working Conditions?

Our Los Angeles Employment Attorneys Discuss Whether a Corporation Is Responsible for Working Conditions at Individual Franchises McDonald’s is involved in a dispute with labor unions that could alter the level of responsibility the company has for labor practices among its franchisees. The National Labor Relations Board is hearing arguments between the corporation and labor unions, and the legal battle could go as far as the Supreme Court. The case began when 19 workers from different franchises filed suit against McDonald’s after they were retaliated against at work for their pro-workers’ rights protests, including protests for a $15 minimum wage. At its most basic, the lawsuit would decide whether McDonald’s the corporation should be considered a joint employer with its franchises. This would mean the corporation would have to answer for accusations of wage violations, harassment and a slew of other labor violations at its franchise locations. If the courts…
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Can Employees Be Fired for Using Medical Marijuana?

Ask a Los Angeles Employment Attorney California is one of only 20 states that authorize the use of medical marijuana. There are hundreds of thousands of people across the state who use cannabis and its related products to treat a number of severe medical conditions. However, many patients using medical marijuana have found that their employers prohibit its use by not recognizing it as a “medical product.” In some situations, employees may be able to seek legal action against employers that do not allow them to use medical marijuana if it is prescribed by a healthcare professional. It is in your best interest to not attempt any legal action without first seeking counsel from a Los Angeles employment attorney. Can Employees Be Fired for Using Medical Marijuana? Although many states, including California, legalized marijuana for medical purposes, very few of these states actually protect against termination on the basis of…
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Did McDonald’s Make a Racist Firing Decision?

Discrimination Attorneys Examine Race-based Wrongful Termination Fast-food giant McDonald’s Corp. is facing allegations of unlawful employment discrimination after the firing of ten African-American and Hispanic workers from three of the company’s Virginia locations. According to the complaint filed in early 2014 in the case of Betts v. McDonald’s Corp., the employees’ supervisors made several racist and discriminatory statements prior to the discharging of the employees, conduct that violates Title VII of the 1964 Civil Rights Act. What is Title VII? Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 protects individuals from workplace discrimination on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex and religion. It ensures equal employment opportunities and prohibits employment decisions based on stereotypes about abilities, traits or performance of individual workers based on race. Thanks to Title VII, discrimination is unlawful in regard to recruiting practices, hiring decisions, promotions, employment transfers, assignments, performance measurements, training, discipline,…
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