Los Angeles Employment And Labor Newsletters

Handling Wage And Overtime Disputes

Over the past year, companies settled several large lawsuits involving wage and overtime disputes with their employees. Wal-Mart reached a global $640 million settlement for denying workers rest breaks and manipulating their time cards to reduce their pay. Lawyers brought the lawsuit as a class action on behalf of hourly workers. UPS recently paid out a $12.8 million settlement for a common, employer mistake of misclassifying independent contractors. Because UPS classified certain employees as independent contracts, the employees were not eligible to receive certain benefits and overtime. About 660 workers were involved in the class action lawsuit, including many who were working for UPS in California. Attorneys involved in the UPS suit are also involved in a similar case against FedEx. The lead counsel noted how risky it is for employers to misclassify people as independent contractors in order to avoid providing benefits, overtime, and other costs that companies incur…
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California Fair Pay Act May Be the Nation’s Toughest

The California Fair Pay Act may be the most aggressive attempt yet in the country to close the salary gap between men and women. The legislation, which passed earlier this month, closes loopholes that prevented enforcement of existing anti-discrimination law. The bill ensures male and female employees who do similar work receive equal pay, even if their job titles aren’t alike or if they work in different offices for the same employer. This means, for example, a female housekeeper at a hotel could protest higher wages paid to a male janitor because they do similar jobs despite having different titles. Furthermore, employees would be allowed to ask about co-workers’ wages without fear of retaliation from employers. “It’s been a long march to try to get laws that are strong enough that would actually close the gender wage gap in this country,” said Noreen Farrell, executive director of Equal Rights Advocates,…
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The California Family Rights Act And How It Affects You

The California Family Rights Act (CFRA) also goes by the name of the Moore-Brown-Roberti Family Rights Act of 1993. The CFRA makes it illegal for employers to refuse to give employees time off if they request it for family or medical care. Family care includes the birth of a child, bonding with the child, or the adoption of a child. Medical care can involve either caring for family members with serious medical conditions or caring for an employee’s own medical problems. If you are facing a family or medical problem and you are concerned for your job security, a Los Angeles employment attorney can explain your rights under the law. Facts About The CFRA To be eligible, employees must have worked for their employer for a total of 12 months and have worked 1,250 hours in the year prior to their request for leave. The employee must also have worked…
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How Can I Prove Wrongfully Termination?

Attorneys Discuss Federal and California Employment Law Jerry Kowal, a former Amazon employee, claimed he was fired by Netflix after a month of working at his new job when his former employer convinced his new employer to terminate him. Kowal claims that, although competitors, Amazon and Netflix have a mutually beneficial relationship in certain areas. For example, Amazon pays millions to Netflix for a storage service. Therefore, Kowal protested that rather than risk losing a well-paying customer, who also happens to be a competitor, Netflix decided to let him go when pressed by Amazon. A case for wrongful termination can be as complicated as this one or much simpler. However, regardless of the complexity of the case, proving wrongful termination is not always easy. If you feel like you have been wrongfully terminated, then you need to contact an attorney that is experienced in handling this delicate matter. What Are…
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