Los Angeles Employment And Labor Newsletters

Filing Claims Under The Americans With Disabilities Act

Several California restaurants have been the target of disability discrimination lawsuits recently. Failure to comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) forced Arctic Circle, a northern California restaurant, to close because its owners decided not to pay for the renovations required. The lawsuit alleged 22 violations of the ADA such as counters that were too high, doors that were not wide enough, and bathrooms that were too small to permit wheelchair access. Popular Sacramento hamburger restaurant Squeeze Inn faced similar allegations. A Food Network program had done a show on the Squeeze Inn before a disabled woman sued the restaurant, which operated in a former coffee house. The woman cited lack of accessible tables and poor gravel parking lots as making the restaurant difficult for her to access. Though the woman dropped the lawsuit last fall, the restaurant’s owners did decide to move to a more accommodating location nearby. If…
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How Can I Protect Myself from Retaliation on Social Media?

Answers from a Los Angeles Employment Attorney The role of social media is growing increasingly large in every area of law, and labor law in particular is still adapting to the precipitous growth of social media websites. Services such as Facebook, Twitter and blogs offer the ability to express your thoughts and emotions to every person you know, and even some you do not. While these websites can be useful for sharing good news, it’s also natural to want to voice complaints or concerns as well. Some individuals may even consider using social media as a method for whistle blowing. Though you do have the right to post almost anything you would like, it is important to know what is protected to avoid retaliation or termination. Safety in Numbers Certain workplace rights are protected under the National Labor Relations Act (“NLRA”) of 1935. In particular, the law states that: “Employees…
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When Is A Termination In California Unlawful?

The majority of workers in California are voluntary “at will” employees. “At will” means that employers have the right to fire or demote an employee for any legal reason without having to provide “just cause” for the action. Employees, similarly, can quit or resign from their positions when they want. Exceptions To “At Will” Employment Status “At will” employment status under the California Labor Code includes the following employees: Public or government employees Employees with a written, verbal or implied contract Employees belonging to a union In some cases an employee’s status can change to “at will” during the course of employment. If, for example, a temporary employee receives verbal notification they can continue in the position, an implied verbal contract is in effect and the employee is now “at will.” A Los Angeles wrongful termination lawyer can help you determine your employee status. Unlawful Termination For “At Will” Employees…
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Our Los Angeles Employment Lawyers Discuss the Anti-Discrimination Settlement Between Houston Community College and the Justice Department

The Department of Justice (DOJ) announced on January 31 that it had reached a settlement agreement with Houston Community College (HCC) over allegations that the college violated the Immigration and Nationality Act’s anti-discrimination provision. The department began investigating the college, which employs approximately 6,000 workers across 20 campuses, after an individual filed a charge alleging that HCC had discriminated against her during the hiring process. The DOJ discovered that “for at least the last two years, HCC has engaged in a pattern or practice of discrimination by requiring non-U.S. citizens to provide specific documentation establishing their work authority, while not making similar demands from U.S. citizens.” The department did not find, however, that the woman who filed the charge had herself been “a victim of the discriminatory practice.” Per the settlement agreement, HCC will pay $83,600 in civil penalties and will create a $20,000 fund to cover back pay compensation…
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