The California Family Rights Act And How It Affects You

The California Family Rights Act (CFRA) also goes by the name of the Moore-Brown-Roberti Family Rights Act of 1993. The CFRA makes it illegal for employers to refuse to give employees time off if they request it for family or medical care. Family care includes the birth of a child, bonding with the child, or the adoption of a child. Medical care can involve either caring for family members with serious medical conditions or caring for an employee’s own medical problems. If you are facing a family or medical problem and you are concerned for your job security, a Los Angeles employment attorney can explain your rights under the law.

Facts About The CFRA

  • To be eligible, employees must have worked for their employer for a total of 12 months and have worked 1,250 hours in the year prior to their request for leave. The employee must also have worked at a location where the employer had at least 50 employees within 75 miles of the employee’s work site.
  • Employers that must abide by CFRA are those that operate in California and employ 50 or more part-time or full-time employees in any state.
  • Eligible employees can receive up to 12 weeks of unpaid leave per year. CFRA requires that employers protect employees’ jobs during this time.
  • If there are any differences between state and federal law, employers must comply with the law that is most beneficial to the employee.
  • For a medical leave involving a serious medical condition, CFRA defines this as a condition involving either in-patient care (such as an overnight stay in the hospital) or continuing treatment or supervision.
  • An employer can require written certification of the serious health condition. The health care provider should include in the writing: (1) the date when the condition started; (2) the probable duration; (3) an estimate of the time needed; (4) a statement that the patient requires the employee’s participation; and, where applicable, (5) a statement that the employee cannot perform an essential job function.
  • CFRA leave is not eligible for disabilities or medical conditions relating to pregnancy. Other California and federal laws enable a mother to take leave in such instances but CFRA does not apply.
  • Employees can add CFRA leave onto other types of leave.
  • The employer must continue health care coverage for employees during the period of CFRA leave if the employer provides health benefits under a group plan.

To learn more about your rights under the California Family Rights Act and other employment laws in California, contact a Los Angeles discrimination attorney at the law offices of Kesluk, Silverstein & Jacob. The California Family Rights Act (CFRA) also goes by the name of the Moore-Brown-Roberti Family Rights Act of 1993. The CFRA makes it illegal for employers to refuse to give employees time off if they request it for family or medical care. Family care includes the birth of a child, bonding with the child, or the adoption of a child. Medical care can involve either caring for family members with serious medical conditions or caring for an employee’s own medical problems. If you are facing a family or medical problem and you are concerned for your job security, a Los Angeles employment attorney can explain your rights under the law.

Facts About The CFRA

  • To be eligible, employees must have worked for their employer for a total of 12 months and have worked 1,250 hours in the year prior to their request for leave. The employee must also have worked at a location where the employer had at least 50 employees within 75 miles of the employee’s work site.
  • Employers that must abide by CFRA are those that operate in California and employ 50 or more part-time or full-time employees in any state.
  • Eligible employees can receive up to 12 weeks of unpaid leave per year. CFRA requires that employers protect employees’ jobs during this time.
  • If there are any differences between state and federal law, employers must comply with the law that is most beneficial to the employee.
  • For a medical leave involving a serious medical condition, CFRA defines this as a condition involving either in-patient care (such as an overnight stay in the hospital) or continuing treatment or supervision.
  • An employer can require written certification of the serious health condition. The health care provider should include in the writing: (1) the date when the condition started; (2) the probable duration; (3) an estimate of the time needed; (4) a statement that the patient requires the employee’s participation; and, where applicable, (5) a statement that the employee cannot perform an essential job function.
  • CFRA leave is not eligible for disabilities or medical conditions relating to pregnancy. Other California and federal laws enable a mother to take leave in such instances but CFRA does not apply.
  • Employees can add CFRA leave onto other types of leave.
  • The employer must continue health care coverage for employees during the period of CFRA leave if the employer provides health benefits under a group plan.

To learn more about your rights under the California Family Rights Act and other employment laws in California, contact a Los Angeles discrimination attorney at the law offices of Kesluk, Silverstein & Jacob.



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